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Five Year Program Review 2010-2015

Using the ACRL Standards for Libraries in Higher Education as a framework, the Harvey A. Andruss Library performed a Five Year Academic Program Review for the Years 2010 to 2015.

Principle 2: Professional Values

2. Libraries advance professional values of intellectual freedom, intellectual property rights and values, user privacy and confidentiality, collaboration, and user-centered service.

2.1 The Library resists all efforts to censor library resources
2.2 The Library protects each library user's right to privacy and confidentiality
2.3 The Library respects intellectual property rights and advocates for balance between the interests of information users and rights
      holders through policy and educational programming
2.4 The Library supports academic integrity and deters plagiarism through policy and education
2.5 The Library commits to a user-centered approach and demonstrates the centrality of users in all aspects of service design and 
      delivery in the physical and virtual environments
2.6 The Library engages in collaborations both on campus and across institutional boundaries

Discussion

The Library is largely satisfied with its performance in the advancement of values that are critical to the library profession, which include intellectual freedom, intellectual property rights and values, user privacy and confidentiality, collaboration, and user-centered service. All Library personnel work consistently to uphold these ideals, and this requires specific knowledge and skills, depending upon the position and role of the personnel member. To date, the Andruss Library has encountered few, if any, challenges that might conflict with these values.  

In efforts to promote the professional values of Librarianship, the Library Director and Library faculty have endeavored to promote knowledge about intellectual freedom and property rights with members of the BU community. They have created an online guide that provides in-depth knowledge about Copyright and Fair Use issues. They have also been speakers at TALE sessions and other professional development events to share information about Fair Use and scholarly communication. However, the Library hopes to further develop its advocacy efforts in this area. As a starting point, the Library can collaborate with subject faculty to see how they can further exercise Fair Use in BOLT, the University’s course management system. The next logical step would be to determine how librarians can help with this, as well as with the integration of Library services into these courses.

The Library has also demonstrated its commitment to a user-centered approach in the services it provides, as well as its physical and virtual environments. This commitment is evident in many significant changes the Library has made throughout the review period to improve services, as well as physical and virtual spaces to meet the needs of students, faculty, staff, and the Bloomsburg community at large. The change from the traditional Reference Desk to the new on-call Research Assistance service simplifies the procedure for students, as now they can request any service, including research assistance, from one service point. The redesigned website provides all members of the BU community with a better organized and more user-friendly access point from which to begin research. Finally, there were many steps taken to provide more study space and improve existing study environments.  Many print journal volumes were converted to electronic versions.  Some print collections were consolidated and moved.  Moveable soft furniture was purchased.  Study carrels, large tables and chairs, soft furniture, and computers were carefully placed to provide a student-centered environment that provides more study space for both individuals and groups.

Furthermore, Library personnel have demonstrated continued commitment to collaboration as a professional value through their work and leadership within consortia such as the Keystone Library Network and professional organizations such as the Pennsylvania Library Association and the American Library Association.

Library personnel have been strong contributors to significant University-wide efforts on assessment, curriculum, strategic planning, University/community relations, and University governance.  In addition Library personnel work with colleagues across campus in improving teaching and learning through initiatives in writing, faculty development, student recruitment, student retention, new student and faculty orientation, student career preparation, and online instruction. Library personnel continue to collaborate through their roles as instructors and liaisons.  However, they also seek opportunities to increase on-campus collaboration, and projects with the Office of Student Affairs and the new Writing in the Disciplines program are promising areas of interest.

2.1 Censorship

2.1 The Library resists all efforts to censor library resources.

ACTIONS

Andruss Library supports the Library Bill of Rights and the Code of Ethics of the American Library Association and has posted links to these documents on the Library website.  Andruss Library is mindful of developing its collections to support research interests of the campus community, and complies with the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Principles for Academic Libraries.  

OUTCOMES

All constituencies in the Bloomsburg community, including students, faculty, and community at large, can pursue their personal and professional research and studies in comprehensive and uncensored learning environments.  

2.2 Privacy & Confidentiality

2.2 The Library protects each library user’s right to privacy and confidentiality.

ACTIONS

As information professionals, all Library administration, staff, faculty, and student workers honor researchers’ privacy with respect to collection development, personal service, and technology support.  Student workers in Access Services are instructed to keep all researchers’ information, interactions, etc. confidential.   All student workers must sign a University confidentiality statement as a requirement of employment. The library circulation system purges borrower information after a prescribed interval.

OUTCOMES

All constituencies in the Bloomsburg community, including students, faculty, and community at large, can pursue their personal and professional research and studies in comprehensive and uncensored learning environments.

2.3 Intellectual Property

2.3 The Library respects intellectual property rights and advocates for balance between the interests of information users and rights holders through policy and educational programming.

ACTIONS

Andruss Library promotes the understanding of the legal and ethical use of information and does its part to preserve the rights of lawful owners of intellectual property.  Faculty and administrators across campus turn to the Director of Library Services and Library faculty for guidance on copyright and fair use issues. In response to faculty questions, a guide with information on Fair Use of copyrighted materials is available. Furthermore, the Director of Library Services and a Library faculty member led a TALE session on Copyright and Fair Use.

The Library operates within the permissible guidelines for usage of and access to databases’ content and complies with licenses.  The Interlibrary Loan unit observes copyright rules while still meeting the needs of researchers.  Moreover, the Library has posted appropriate signage by photocopiers and scanners, with brief reminders about fair use and copyright.

OUTCOMES

All constituencies in the Bloomsburg community, including students, faculty, and community at large, can pursue their personal and professional research and studies in comprehensive and uncensored learning environments.

Faculty benefit from the expertise on fair use and copyright among the Library personnel.  Faculty often approach the Learning Management System and Instructional Media staff with questions about fair use and copyright, and they are referred to the Director of Library Services for further information and/or further referrals.  

2.4 Academic Integrity

2.4 The Library supports academic integrity and deters plagiarism through policy and education.

ACTIONS

The Library supports and promotes the University’s efforts and expectations of researchers’ academic integrity and fair use of others’ works as expressed in the University’s PRP 3512 Academic Integrity Policy.

Library faculty often respond to individual researcher’s needs, both students and faculty, for proper citation, in terms of both formatting and judging appropriate needs for citation of others’ works. Further, the Library faculty have addressed citation and fair use (ACRL Information Literacy Standard 5) in 47.1% of their Information Literacy Instruction Sessions during this review period, and frequently incorporate this standard into their Course and Subject Research Guides.  

The Library offers numerous print and online resources to aid in students’ citation formats, as well as guidelines on the circumstances in which a researcher is ethically bound to cite.

OUTCOMES

All constituencies in the Bloomsburg community, including students, faculty, and community at large, can pursue their personal and professional creative work making full use of resources while also respecting academic integrity.  

2.5 Library User

2.5 The Library commits to a user-centered approach and demonstrates the centrality of users in all aspects of service design and delivery in the physical and virtual environments.

Actions:  Mission Statement and Strategic Plan

In the course of developing a new Mission Statement and Strategic Plan for the Library, Library personnel used comments and suggestions from students and other patrons that were written on whiteboards at the entrance of the building.  The Library Advisory Committee, consisting of faculty and students, was consulted at regular intervals for its input.

Outcomes:  Mission Statement and Strategic Plan

The Library’s Mission Statement and Strategic Plan was shaped by direct feedback from University students and faculty.

Actions: Physical Space

The Library has made numerous adjustments to its physical spaces with researchers’ needs in mind.  In response to LibQUAL results calling for more group study space, the Library responded by identifying additional space for private and group study.  Print collections were condensed and/or moved, in some cases more than once, to make them more visible and browsable, and to provide more space for study tables and carrels. Shelving ranges were removed to widen major aisles.

The main part of the first floor was repurposed from a bound periodicals room to a large study and meeting room for patrons. A second study and reading room was created in the Tiffany Windows Alcove on the second floor.  Available office and storage rooms were converted to group study rooms as well as the Teaching and Learning Enhancement (TALE) Center.  In addition the Library has provided space to the Writing Center tutors on a long-term basis and provided temporary space for the Writing Fellows program that supports the developmental writing courses.

During the review period, the Library created a small Popular Reading Collection based on student requests for “fun reading” material.  The collection consists mostly of genre and Young Adult fiction.  It is located on the first floor near the Circulation Desk, which makes for easy browsing of the collection.  Student reception has been positive, with a circulation rate just over 60%. 

The Library has made several adjustments to improve computing resources in the building with researchers’ needs in mind.  In response to LibQUAL results calling for faster computers, the Library advocated for replacement of slower devices.  Reference and Information Desks were moved in an effort to be more visible and then were ultimately converted to additional work space for patrons. 

Research Assistance remains a visible and important resource to patrons via a referral system through the Circulation Desk staff.

The Library expanded hours on Friday evenings and at the end of semester in response to student government request.

Recently the University launched construction to repurpose a portion of the Library and create adjoining space for other University offices. The construction disrupted study space, but all study furniture was retained in the building, noise abatement earplugs were made available, and alternate study space was secured for finals week.  The repurposing of the Library space permanently reduces the work area for Acquisitions and Cataloging staff, but the change ultimately makes possible other construction projects on campus that will expand space for residence halls, classrooms, and faculty offices.

Outcomes: Physical Space

Students and other patrons use the building frequently, especially from the midpoint of the semester onwards.  Students and other patrons have several study space options throughout the building.  On the first floor, patrons can study individually in carrels, at tables, or in soft seating, including couches with writing surfaces, and beanbag chairs.  They can also study with a group at tables or in clusters of soft seating.  On upper floors, patrons can choose from a similar array of study spaces. Students and other patrons have a quieter reading room on the second floor in the Tiffany Windows Alcove.  Students may also check out rolling whiteboards to use in these open study areas.  Students can find computer workstations throughout the building with the greatest concentration being on the second floor.

Students and other patrons have ready access to a streamlined print Reference Collection.  Patrons can easily find the Collection and benefit from improved lighting and some lower shelving.

Education students, local parents, and teachers have easy access to the Juvenile, Young Adult, and Curriculum collections which were moved to a more visible location on the second floor.

Students and other patrons ordinarily have access to 32 group study rooms, all equipped with a computer as well as most rooms having large wall screens for group viewing (see Appendix A Item 3).

Students and other patrons have access to faster computers as a result of the Library’s advocacy for replacement of slower machines.  Students and other patrons also have access to a large number of computer resources, with nearly 300 computer/study carrels as well as 20 laptops.  In addition, scanners, color printers and specialized and accommodative software is readily available.  Students have additional computer work space at the ‘study bars’ created from the former reference and information desks;  by adding some wooden stools and a few computers, these substantial desks were put to good use at fairly low cost.   

Students and other patrons have ready access to research assistance via a scheduled on-call system from the prominently located Circulation Desk.  Patrons approach the Circulation Desk, and the Library faculty are paged to come to work with the patron in the workspace of the patron’s choice.   

Students wanting advice on their writing have easy access to tutors via the Writing Center satellite office and the Writing Fellows presence established in the Library.

Students and other patrons have access to the library building for more hours on Fridays and at end of semester.

Students and faculty benefit from the repurposing of Library space because ultimately it allows the campus to expand access to personal space that has often been lost in overcrowded residence halls, insufficient number of classrooms, and inadequate subject faculty offices.  Reduction in staff work area and resulting layout of work area may require more active oversight of student assistants who are at a greater remove than before.

Actions: Online Space

The Library has made several changes to the online environment as well, in an effort to improve user experience.  A major home page redesign in 2012 and an upgraded platform in 2015 are purposely more user-centered in language and function. The login requirements were changed to permit entry of campus username and password rather than a long numerical code.  The Library invested funds and human resources to improve virtual ILL and create a document delivery service (a service of online transmission of documents in the Library’s print holdings).

Outcomes: Online Space

Patrons have quick access via the homepage to:

  • easy off-campus login and other vital information for off-campus users
  • all-in-one search box for books and articles
  • contact information for expert research guidance via phone, email, SMS, and IM
  • hours for the Library building and various services
  • University Writing Center
  • guides for Developing a Topic and Citing
  • real-time service to find out the number of available computers on each floor of the Library

Patrons have quick access via the website to:

  • request and receive quick delivery of materials from other libraries
  • guides for specific audiences, by subject and for special topics, such as graduate school test preparation
  • electronic forms for ILL, Reserves, book purchase request, and Information Literacy Instruction request
  • General Library Research Tutorial

2.6 Collaboration

2.6 The Library engages in collaborations both on campus and across institutional boundaries.

ACTIONS

The Library administration, faculty, and staff consistently contribute to the collaborations on campus in a variety of ways.   Librarians make an impact on numerous campus-wide committees and working groups because of their collaborative nature, interdisciplinary backgrounds, and unique perspectives.  In addition to the contributions of individual Library faculty to significant University-wide efforts on assessment, curriculum, strategic planning, University/community relations, and University governance, the Library works with colleagues across campus in improving teaching and learning through initiatives in writing, faculty development, student recruitment, student retention, new student and faculty orientation, student career preparation, and online instruction.   

Strong collaborations with the local public libraries and historical societies continue to be fostered through, for example, the long-time contributions of the University Archivist & Coordinator of Special Collections as well as the recent appointment of the Director to the Public Library’s Board of Directors.

As a member of the Keystone Library Network (KLN), a consortium of 17 Pennsylvania colleges and universities, including all of the PASSHE universities, Bloomsburg University’s Andruss Library exhibits an organizational commitment to working with peer organizations across the state.  In fact, the Director of Library Services and Library faculty exhibit leadership through the Chairship of the KLN Council and strong participation and/or leadership of KLN initiatives.  

Library administration, faculty, and staff contribute to the activities of regional, state, national, and international library organizations.

For a complete list of activities, please see Appendix A Item 4.

OUTCOMES

Campus decision-making bodies benefit not only from the knowledge of librarians, but also their collaborative and cross-campus perspective.  This contributes to solidifying librarians’ roles as educators.  The Library faculty and the Director of Library Services contribute to shared governance, decision making and strategic planning to ensure that the priority of students’ and faculty’s research is represented amongst many University initiatives.    

The University’s profile is heightened by the roles that Library personnel play in the local community, and the relations between the University and the community are improved.

Students, faculty, staff, and the community at large benefit from the resources made available through the consortial work of the KLN since they are able to access more and different resources than Bloomsburg University would be able to provide as a single institution.  

The library profession as a whole, as well as members of the Bloomsburg University community, benefit from librarian participation in regional, state, and national  library organizations; not only do their contributions contribute to the advancement of the library profession, but they also lead to improved library practices.

Subject Librarians

Information Literacy Instruction

Off-Campus Access

Interlibrary Loan

Chronicle of Higher Education

Reserves/Fair Use

Ask Us

Research Consultations

Renew Books Online

Request a Purchase

Group Study Rooms

Open Computers

About Us 

Library Fines

PA Resident Cards

Suggestion Box

Employment

Giving to the Library

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